F.A.Q.

Average time is 200 – 300 hours from start to finish.

The traditional recipe is maple for back, sides, and neck.  Spuce for the belly.
The reason being that violins actually work similarly to a drum – with the soft flexible drum skin making the sound and the drum body reflecting the sound out to our ears.  Violins have a flexible soft wood spruce belly (the top) which produces most of the sound, and the hardwood maple back and sides reflect the sound out to our ears.

They’re physically exactly the same, the difference is all in the setup.  Violins are mainly setup for classical players, usually with sweet sounding nylon/perlon strings, and with standardised string spacings, string heights, and bridge radius.  Fiddles are mainly setup for ‘fiddlers’ or fast players, usually with the brighter sounding steel strings, a lower string height, and a flatter bridge to help with fast string crossing.

If the peg seems too loose:
First, when tuning, make sure you 'push' the peg inwards into the scroll as you turn it. Pegs are tapered in shape, and turning them normally just makes then loose.  You need to 'push & turn' simultaneously while tuning.
Second: try a very very small drop of water on the the peg where it goes through the scroll on each side. This swells the wood fibres and makes the peg fit immediately more tight.

Very important!
In all cases, make sure the string is wound correctly onto the peg. Winding the string onto the peg the wrong way will quickly prevent the peg from holding its position correctly, and makes tuning impossible. Here is a recommended video tutorial:
https://youtu.be/I5GlmQmy_PA

A very common problem during winter time, because the damp air swells the pegs and makes them larger, so tighter in the hole. Sometimes the peg won't turn at all!  In this case, remove the peg and try some household chalk on the peg where it normally touches the sides of the holes. Chalk can help in an emergency, though more professional peg compounds such as "Hill"'peg paste can also be purchased from any good music store.

NB: If the peg has become so tight that it cannot be removed, then the peg needs to be professionally extracted by a Luthier.  Don't try to force it, as you may crack the wood.

Very important!
In all cases, make sure the string is wound correctly onto the peg. Winding the string onto the peg the wrong way will quickly prevent the peg from holding its position correctly, and makes tuning impossible. Here is a recommended video tutorial:
https://youtu.be/I5GlmQmy_PA

Bows range in weight anywhere between 55 grams to 69 grams.  The average weight is around 62 grams.   Bows are a personal choice, and an extension of the players arm. The bone density and arm length of the player will directly affect the way a bow works for them.  We're all different in physique, so of course there is no all-round bow that is perfect for everybody. 

Thanks for trusting us to give you advice about the violin you've seen on Ebay.  It is our policy to never give recommendations about second hand violins that are for sale on the internet.    There are so many variables when buying a second hand violin, that it is impossible to be 100% certain about a violin with physically seeing it, and ideally also hearing it.  Probems are often not visible in photos, and many times unknown to the seller too!  Worn pegs, chips, cracks, borer/woodworm, open glue joints, misaligned necks, warped bridges, worn or warped fingerboards, worn and dull strings ... and the list goes on.  At the String Workshop we have a great range of New, Pre-loved, and Antique violins to suit every size, age group and skill level, beginner to expert.  All violins are professionally set up and serviced to be in top playing condition, and you're always welcome to try before you buy.